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Obama Baby, or 2008 Revolution: Part 1 June 5, 2008

Posted by roxieroo8125 in Uncategorized.
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2008 is the 40th “anniversary” of 1968, in a way. The year was tumultuous, horrifying, and sealed the chasm that has existed between ‘liberals’ and ‘conservatives’ that has existed ever since. 2008 is also an odd parallel to the year 1968. Now, my generation isn’t having a Woodstock, and the counterculture isn’t as pervasive as it was then. However, we are in the middle of a war that half the country does not support. We are entering an election that will certainly be for the record books (if for no other reason, because our nation has finally nominated a candidate who isn’t a WASP (or a WASCatholic) and we strongly considered a woman). It makes a 20-something really think.

The Election

A number of years ago, when Sen. John McCain was coming into political fame, I read a number of articles about him. I was in AP Government and it was an election year, and while the Republican nominee was pretty obvious, my teacher made sure we kept abreast of all of the possible players in what would be another amazingly electric campaign year, even despite the outcome. I read about this moderate individual who had survived for years in the “Hanoi Hilton”, serving his country in the most dramatic way possible, and now was serving in the U.S. Senate. He was sponsoring bills that I thought were productive and I pretty much thought that the Senator from Arizona was pretty awesome. When I registered to vote in early 2004, I considered registering Republican for a hot second because I wanted to help McCain become president one day; however, in my heart, I knew that I was a Democrat. I followed Howard Dean exclusively for my government class, and even had to bore the embarrassment of his screaming fit in front of my class. I registered, voted in the primaries, and was on my way.

Now, I have to admit something. In the fall of 2004, I had to submit an absentee ballot because I lived in Philadelphia attending my freshman year at La Salle. I sent my request form in more than on time, but I was never sent my actual ballot. I did not get to vote in my first Presidential election, which was more disappointing than I can describe. I had been waiting to vote since the first grade, when I memorized the Presidents and told my grandma that I was going to be President. I was bummed. My candidate of choice won in PA, but would ultimately lose the election. This spring, I got lazy and didn’t get my absentee ballot. I didn’t vote in one of the most important primary of the 2008 election, and my candidate lost. He is now the presumptive nominee, but I got worried that my vote could have helped him win PA. I was disappointed in myself, and one of my two best friends at La Salle was even more disappointed in me. Because of this, I am determined to make up for this by being more politically active now that I’m at home. I will campaign for Obama in Harrisburg, where he could really use my help. And yes Michele, I will vote. I will get up early and vote at the Midway Fire Hall in Enola.

But wait? Didn’t I just say how enamored by McCain I was in 2004? This is true. I still have amazing respect for the man. He is a true American hero and deserves the respect of his country. However, I feel that he has betrayed his principles to gain the nomination of his party and will just be another Bush. The nation is a mess and we need something more. This is where Obama comes in. I have never been so energized by a candidate. I almost feel like I’m listening to a Kennedy or a Jefferson when I hear him speak. I want him to represent my nation and lead us for the next four to eight years. Yes he’s young, and perhaps he has less experience than McCain. Who cares? Looking at some of the most experienced politicians we’ve had in history (Nixon, Bush), I think inexperience might be a nice change. Remember: The most our first four Presidents had in the way of political experience was committing treason. Obama can inspire in so many ways. He pulled himself up through education and self-reliance. What’s more American then that?

I had given up my aspiration to be President shortly after my grandma passed away in 1995. At first it was because she had said she would vote for me and I wasn’t going to run if my #1 fan wasn’t going to be able to cast a ballot. However, as time wore on, I realized that the job of President is very dangerous. You can get killed and I really wasn’t up for that risk. I also didn’t realize the vast number of ways I could work in politics without being President, something that I now realize. I thank The West Wing for that. I freaking love that show and if I could grow up to be even Donna Moss, I’d be happy. Obama has also re-energized that dream for me. I want to run for public office as soon as I walk in two years at Penn State Harrisburg. I want to help with education reform, which I feel is the root of almost every domestic problem in the United States. I am born anew in the energy that he exudes and I hope that his full potential can be realized in the next few months.

I’ll be covering more of the parallels in time. I just wanted to ramble a bit about McCain and Obama and myself.

Onward.

PS: In November, Vote.

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Comments»

1. Sara - June 7, 2008

2. Jo Anna - June 13, 2008

go for it.

That’s all I’ve been telling people.

Just freakin go for it.


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