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Playing in the Sand. July 14, 2008

Posted by roxieroo8125 in Uncategorized.
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Although I just returned from a relaxing, but all too short, vacation in the Outer Banks, this entry is not about said trip. 

This morning I received multiple phone calls informing me of the passing of Mr. John Grady.  He was the head of the Honors Program at La Salle University, an aspect of the university that garners nothing but praise.  As my time at La Salle slips away from me, it is especially difficult to say good-bye to a person who was such a large part of my time there, even if it is only based on the fact that he accepted me into the program that changed my life. 

Prior to the Honors Program, I only thought of grad school in a fleeting way.  I talked about it with my parents and advisors, but when the students of the class of 2008 met each semester to talk with Mr. Grady about classes and our futures, suddenly grad school was underachieving.  There was a whole world of achievement that I had no idea existed, and the least I could do was get my Master’s degree.  I think about the people, both friends and faculty, who helped me get there, and I cannot help but include Mr. Grady in that list. 

Between the passing of Dr. Kerlin, one of my beloved professors, in November and the passing of Mr. Grady just last night, I feel like the La Salle I knew only two months before is slipping away (like sand…get the title?).  Granted, the buildings are still there and 95% of my professors are still teaching, but it is already changing in ways that I was not prepared for.  I had no idea that my trip to the honors center to get my certificate on graduation day would probably be my very last time in the basement of McShain. 

When I left high school, I was thrilled.  Although I was petrified to begin my life at La Salle, I was thrilled to be out of the veritable prison that was East Pennsboro.  I had friends, but I knew there was something better in Philadelphia.  I still see my old teachers, but many of them have moved on.  It never affected me in this way.  I wish everyday that I could go back to La Salle.  I probably will one day, either to teach or because I’ll be a parent of a La Salle student…maybe even to do something with the Masque.  Hopefully to teach.  I’m just amazed at how different it is to leave a school one spent four short years at than it was to leave the school at which I had spent 13 long years.

I know La Salle will keep changing in ways that I’m not going to be pleased with.  My Masque kids will graduate…I won’t know the people on Improv anymore…Other professors will retire.  I just wasn’t really ready for it to start changing so soon.

Rest in Peace, Mr. Grady.  You will be missed.

Onward.

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Comments»

1. Jon Caroulis - July 14, 2008

Hi,

I work at La Salle’s PR office and I’m doing the obit for Mr. Grady (your column showed up on Google). Could I use some of your comments in your blog in the obituary — and add your name, too?).

Thanks,
Jon Caroulis
La Salle University


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